Oyster Blog

Mar 25, 2008: Area Dog Discovers Taste for Oysters

News from Here

There are two types of oyster eater: those who are born loving oysters, and those who grow into the taste. For one local dog, the oyster epiphany came last Saturday at an informal campfire gathering in Lilliwaup. Since puppyhood Area Dog has lived on Hood Canal, but this was the first time he'd expressed interest in oysters. (Caveat: only in Lilliwaup, where the hens lay soft-boiled eggs and the lemonade springs, would it be o.k. to feed world-class shellfish to a dog.)   Area Dog signals interest in oyster... gets ignored... and then finds the stash. Would somebody please just...

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Mar 21, 2008: Inside the shucking plant part 1

Farm work

John and Juan at the shucking table. Roberto and Nathan. Roberto's hand is blurry because it's moving wicked fast. We only shuck oyster clusters, and save the single oysters to sell in the shell. The shuckers have to shuck both big and little oysters. We sell four sizes of oysters: yearling, extra small, small and medium. Pictured above are oysters from both ends of the spectrum, the yearling and the medium.

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Mar 20, 2008: Steelhead Project on the Hamma Hamma

News from Here

Long Live the Kings, a non-profit group working to restore native salmon populations, has just completed a 12-year steelhead restoration program on the Hamma Hamma River. The project has gotten great coverage from the Kitsap Sun, check it out here. The really exciting thing about LLTK is that they've developed and implemented a hatchery system that preserves the genetic diversity of the wild fish populations. They take a small number of eggs out of the redds (or nests) produced by native, wild fish, then hatch the eggs in a hatchery and raise the fish for 4 to 5 years before...

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Mar 18, 2008: Ancient Oyster Photo Shoot, or how NASA faked the moon landing

Oysters

Pacific oysters can grow really, really big if left to their own devices. We keep this monster oyster shell in our store to show to interested customers. It also goes on tour with us occasionally...down to Portland to decorate our booth at the NW Food and Wine Festival...over to Seattle for one of the numerous oyster events we participate in. Barnacles close-up Oyster tree-rings In a later post we'll talk about oyster predators... one of which makes oysters develop the pock-marked pattern shown above. Piggy-back oyster. T.J. and Jean Hsu, visiting from Texas, stopped by to take a tour of...

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Mar 17, 2008: Hermit Crab with Good Taste in Architecture

Tideflat Critters

Hermit Crab in Moon Snail Shell Fragment   This lovely creature is a Hairy Hermit (Pagurus hirsutiusculus)--a species easily identified by the white bands around its walking legs (which you can clearly see in the middle photo). It came in on the oyster barge and was put back out on the beach after the photo shoot. Hairy Hermits are the most common hermit crabs in Puget Sound. Like all hermit crabs, they make their home in abandoned snail shells. A hermit crab's asymmetrical, unprotected abdomen fits easily into spiral snail shells. Hermit crabs won't kill a snail in order to...

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