Oyster Blog — Oysters

Mar 3, 2010: The advantage of being beach hardened

Farm work Oysters

A couple of months ago Adam pulled some seed out of a grow-bag and brought it into the store to shuck. The oysters had led sheltered lives... they hadn't yet been tumbled or tossed around on the beach, and so they had soft, brittle shells that broke into pieces when we shucked them. You might be upset if you ordered oysters in a restaurant and that mess arrived on your plate! The Hama Hama Oyster Mama was so strong in her twenties that she could twist an apple into two pieces. Now we're taking it a step further and opening...

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Sep 16, 2009: Oyster Culture

Farm work Oysters

My beautiful picture

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Sep 3, 2009: Olympia oysters, and a book plug.

Oyster World Oysters

We've never noticed before how colorful Olympia oyster shells are. They're full of earth tones: browns, deep purples, and mossy greens. There are places on the farm where Olympias are abundant. They live on and amongst the larger Pacific oysters. These particular Olys had the misfortune to be attached to Pacific oysters that came up to shore to be shucked. We pried about 50 of them off the Pacifics, ate a couple, and put the rest out on the beach. If you're at all interested in learning more about the history of the Olympia oyster, we highly recommend Rowan Jacobsen's...

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July 28, 2009: Spawn Party

Oysters

It's been hot and dry for weeks, the water has warmed up, and the oysters are starting to spawn.  And this is actually a really good thing, because although we do buy oyster seed, we rely on natural "sets" to maintain the farm's oyster population and genetic diversity. As Teresa puts it, the fact that the estuary is right now glowing fluorescent white with oyster spawn is "job security." To clarify: it's the spawn that looks tropical, not the Canal. Normally the Canal is a dark, beautiful blue. The fertilized eggs will form larvae and swim around in the Canal...

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Jul 20, 2009: Oyster Snake

Oysters

The flotsam and jetsam is getting sillier every day. Some oysters have absolutely no taste: yesterday we found one that had permanently attached itself to a fake snake.

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