Oyster Blog — Oysters

Feb 4, 2011: Winter Tideflats

Oysters Tideflat Critters

Here are some photos from a nighttime beach walk we took a couple of weeks ago. Ever wonder what diving ducks do underwater? In the photo below you can see a duck excavation, created by foraging a surf scoter, white wing, or other clam-eating duck. In the winter the tideflats are covered with these pits, and the hungry ducks are one reason we always put nets over areas of the beach where we've spread clam seed. We also found a spotted dorid hanging out. The most common nudibranch on our beach is the yellow monterey dorid, so finding this spotted guy was a treat. One...

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Jan 17, 2011: Meet the Blue Pool!

Oysters

We are very happy to announce that we've finally started selling our new brand of oyster, the Blue Pool.  The name Blue Pool is inspired by a cold, quiet place on the Hamma Hamma River that our family has enjoyed for generations. While most Hama Hama oysters grow directly on the beach, Blue Pools are grown in bags that rise and fall with each tidal cycle (read more about our tumble farm here). This action rolls the oysters around, breaking off their new growth and pruning them into the perfect half-shell shape, with a flat top shell and a pronounced deep...

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Dec 10, 2010: Another Ugliest Pearl Contestant

Oysters

This thing came across the packing table today. Whatever it was, it must have gotten trapped inside an oyster and then covered with nacre. Diana suggests it might have been a barnacle... and despite the fact that barnacles are especially difficult sea creatures to relate to, the thought of being swallowed alive by an oyster and then slowly encased in shell is pretty creepy. See our earlier "ugliest pearl" entries here. And it says a lot about the quality of pearl produced by Pacific oysters that we haven't bothered to start a "most beautiful pearl" contest...

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Nov 19, 2010: Hama Hamas. Are those the big ones, or the little ones?

Farm work Oysters

Our oysters come in all different sizes, and yesterday both ends of the spectrum came across the packing table. Teresa documented it with her camera phone. A perfectly small yearling:   And here is an oyster we would call a medium, simply because we don't have a sort called "outrageously large oysters:" On another note: if you want to ship your Thanksgiving oysters using 2day delivery you need to get your orders in before Monday morning. Happy weekend!

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Sep 14, 2010: Autumn, Again

Oysters

Indian summer weather is here, and we love it. This weekend we'll be celebrating fall with some DIY food prep: picking wild chanterelles, pressing apple cider,  and eating everything out of the garden before the caterpillars do.   The hub-bub of summer seed processing is over and tourists are getting scarcer, so the farm has seemed very peaceful of late. And, just in time to miss most of our summer business:  raw oysters are back in season.  Last Sunday we were lucky enough to go to a muscadet tasting at Campagne restaurant in Seattle, where Chef Daisley Gordon paired muscadet with oysters from yours truly and...

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